The Library Board Recommends...

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Parenting


The first thing parents learn is that children don’t come with instruction manuals. Here at the American Fork library . . . we can’t help with that. But we CAN connect you with some excellent authors who will help you think—just as soon as you can get your children to give you two quiet seconds in a row.

Our parenting titles include New York Times bestsellers and recent releases from 2017 and 2018.

We have books on every phase of childhood—from Secrets of the Baby Whisperer to The Ultimate Guide to Raising Teens and Tweens.

We have books to help you guide your girls (The Drama Years: Real Girls Talk) as well as your boys (That Crumpled Paper Was Due Last Week).

We have essentials for all ages and types, including the widely acclaimed How to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk and the New York Times bestseller, No-Drama Discipline.

And some of our titles are just plain interesting, like Achtung Baby—the perspective of an American parent living in Germany—and Bringing Up Bébé —the perspective of an American mother in France.

We’re also presenting two free parenting classes in April: 
Dads Matter, presented by Healthy Relationships Utah—a free, research-based parenting course for father and father figures. This will be a five-week session held Wednesdays from April 11 through May 9 from 6:30-8:30 pm. To enroll, register at HealthyRelationshipsUtah.org
Families Talking Together presented by the Utah County Health Department.  This free class will help parents hold difficult conversations about sex with their teens Thursday, April 12, at 7 pm.

One of the library board’s highest priorities is meeting the informational needs of families. Check out some of the titles below, and if you don’t find what you’re looking for, please leave a request at the front desk letting us know what you’d like to see.

Secrets of the Baby Whisperer

Secrets of the Baby Whisperer: How to Calm, Connect, and Communicate with Your Baby, by Tracy Hogg and Melinda Blau, 2005. When Secrets of the Baby Whisperer was first published, it soared onto bestseller lists across the country. Parents everywhere became “whisperers” to their newborns, amazed that they could actually communicate with their baby within weeks of their child’s birth. Tracy gave parents what for some amounted to a miracle: the ability to understand their baby’s every coo and cry so that they could tell immediately if the baby was hungry, tired, in real distress, or just in need of a little TLC. Now you too can benefit from Tracy’s more than twenty years’ experience. At the heart of Tracy’s simple but profound message: treat the baby as you would like to be treated yourself. Reassuring, down-to-earth, and often flying in the face of conventional wisdom, Secrets of the Baby Whisperer promises parents not only a healthier, happier baby but a more relaxed and happy household as well.

Jo Frosts Toddler RulesJo Frost's Toddler Rules: Your 5-Step Guide to Shaping Proper Behavior, by Jo Frost, 2014. Jo Frost has always had a natural gift for connecting with kids, and for helping parents navigate milestones with practical know-how and ease. With the success of her hit TV shows Supernanny, Extreme Parental Guidance, and Family S.O.S. with Jo Frost, she’s proven her ability to expertly rein in unacceptable conduct and bring peace and stability to millions of homes worldwide. Now, in this invaluable book, she shows you how to identify and eliminate toddler tantrums and curb behaviors in other child-rearing areas. The key to achieving success with these Toddler Rules is Frost’s proven S.O.S. method: Step Back, Observe, Step In. Complete with troubleshooting tips for living tantrum-free, this welcome, honest, straightforward guide has all you need to help your children grow, thrive, and make family time even more precious.

Organizing the Disorganized ChildOrganizing the Disorganized Child: Simple Strategies to Succeed in School, by Martin Kutscher and Marcella Moran, 2009. "You can imagine what my child′s room looked like: clothes on the floor, dresser draws open with clothes half hanging out of them, and toys spread all over the floor.” "Jill is given an assignment on Monday that is due on Friday. The problem is that despite repeated nagging, she won′t start it until Thursday night." Organizing the Disorganized Child finally answers the parents′ question, "How can I help my child get organized without waging a battle?" This toolkit for parents and educators factors organizational styles into the equation and offers effective strategies that deliver amazing long-term results. Renowned ADHD expert Dr. Martin Kutscher and coach Marcella Moran explain the roots of our children′s organizational problems, and the parents′ role in fixing them. They outline different organizational styles used by different students and provide a step-by-step plan for an organizational system.

The Ultimate Guide to Raising Teens and TweensThe Ultimate Guide to Raising Teens and Tweens: Strategies for Unlocking Your Child’s Full Potential, by Douglas Haddad, 2017. Are you concerned or frustrated with the choices your child makes when it comes to their peer groups, study habits, and use of social media? Do you feel your child is pushing you away and your connection is weakening? Are you unsure of the next steps you should take to help your child succeed? A whole new set of parenting concerns arise during tween and teenhood that can be overwhelming for any parent. The Ultimate Guide to Raising Teens and Tweens offers a step-by-step plan for raising your adolescent through this tumultuous time. Every parent wants the best for their child, and these years can be fraught with challenges: bullying, violence, gambling, sex, smoking, alcohol, substance use, eating disorders, depression, suicide, unhealthy eating, lack of physical activity, etc. Making sense of these challenges, this book offers exercises for incorporating the ten child unlimited tools into your parenting style and anecdotes to illustrate strategies and techniques. Supported by current research, the tools found in these pages will serve as a guide for any family with tweens or teens.

Boys Should Be BoysBoys Should Be Boys: 7 Secrets to Raising Healthy Sons, by Meg Meeker, 2009. In Boys Should Be Boys, one of our most trusted authorities helps parents restore the delights of boyhood and enable today’s boys to become the mature, confident, and thoughtful men of tomorrow. Boys will always be boys–rambunctious, adventurous, and curious, climbing trees, building forts, playing tackle football, and pushing their growing bodies to the limit as part of the rite of passage into manhood. But today our sons face an increasingly hostile world that doesn’t value the high-spirited, magical nature of boys. In a collective call to let our boys be boys, Dr. Meg Meeker explores the secrets to boyhood, including why rules and boundaries are crucial–and why boys feel lost without them; how the outdoors is still the best playground, offering the sense of adventure that only Mother Nature can provide; the pitfalls moms and dads face when talking to their sons; why moody and rebellious boys are not normal–and how to address such behavior; how and when the “big” questions in life should be discussed: why he is here, what his purpose is, and why he is important. Parents are blessed with intuition and heart, but raising sons is a daunting responsibility. This uplifting guide makes the job a little easier.

The Drama YearsThe Drama Years: Real Girls Talk About Surviving Middle School -- Bullies, Brands, Body Image, and More, by Haley Kilpatrick, 2012. Today’s middle school girls have it rough. In a few short years, they go through an incredible number of biological and emotional changes, making this the most formative—and riskiest—time in their lives. Groups turn on each other, a trusted childhood friend can reveal secrets by sending a text message or updating a Facebook status, and deciding where to sit in the cafeteria can be a daily struggle. As any tween will tell you, life for a middle school girl can be summed up in one word: drama. Haley Kilpatrick’s own turbulent middle school experience inspired Girl Talk, a nonprofit organization in which high school mentors offer a “just been there” perspective to tween girls, helping them build self-esteem and develop leadership skills. Here, Haley delivers the definitive guidebook, packed with anecdotes from real girls around the country, who offer their insight into why her friends’ approval is suddenly vitally important, why she feels pressured to be perfect, why she’s no longer telling her parents everything, and what three vital things adults can offer to the girls in their lives to downplay the drama.

That Crumpled PaperThat Crumpled Paper Was Due Last Week: Helping Disorganized and Distracted Boys Succeed in School and Life, by Ana Homayoun, 2010. Missed assignments. Lack of focus and enthusiasm. Falling grades. For too many boys and their frustrated parents, these are the facts of life. But they don't have to be. At last, the solution for getting disorganized boys back on track. Top academic counselor Ana Homayoun has helped turn even the most disorganized, scattered, and unfocused boys into successful young people who consistently meet their personal and academic challenges. She does this by getting back to basics—starting with a simple fact: Most boys need to be taught how to get organized, how to study, and—most important—how to visualize, embrace and meet their own goals.

How to Talk So Kids Will ListenHow to Talk So Kids Will Listen and Listen So Kids Will Talk, by Adele Faber and Elaine Mazlish, 2012. The ultimate “parenting bible” (The Boston Globe)—a timeless, beloved book on how to effectively communicate with your child from the #1 New York Times bestselling authors. This best-selling classic includes fresh insights and suggestions as well as the author’s time-tested methods to solve common problems and build foundations for lasting relationships, including innovative ways to:

·      Cope with your child's negative feelings, such as frustration, anger, and disappointment

·      Express your strong feelings without being hurtful

·      Engage your child's willing cooperation

·      Set firm limits and maintain goodwill

·      Use alternatives to punishment that promote self-discipline

·      Understand the difference between helpful and unhelpful praise

·      Resolve family conflicts peacefully

Enthusiastically praised by parents and professionals around the world, the down-to-earth, respectful approach of Faber and Mazlish makes relationships with children of all ages less stressful and more rewarding.

No Drama DisciplineNo-Drama Discipline: The Whole-Brain Way to Calm the Chaos and Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind, by Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson, 2016. NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER. The pioneering experts behind The Whole-Brain Child and The Yes Brain tackle the ultimate parenting challenge: discipline. Highlighting the fascinating link between a child’s neurological development and the way a parent reacts to misbehavior, No-Drama Discipline provides an effective, compassionate road map for dealing with tantrums, tensions, and tears—without causing a scene. Defining the true meaning of the “d” word (to instruct, not to shout or reprimand), the authors explain how to reach your child, redirect emotions, and turn a meltdown into an opportunity for growth. By doing so, the cycle of negative behavior (and punishment) is essentially brought to a halt, as problem solving becomes a win/win situation. Complete with candid stories and playful illustrations that bring the authors’ suggestions to life, No-Drama Discipline shows you how to work with your child’s developing mind, peacefully resolve conflicts, and inspire happiness and strengthen resilience in everyone in the family.

Achtung BabyAchtung Baby: An American Mom on the German Art of Raising Self-Reliant Children, by Sara Zaske, 2018. When Sara Zaske moved from Oregon to Berlin with her husband and toddler, she knew the transition would be challenging, especially when she became pregnant with her second child. She was surprised to discover that German parents give their children a great deal of freedom―much more than Americans. In Berlin, kids walk to school by themselves, ride the subway alone, cut food with sharp knives, and even play with fire. German parents did not share her fears, and their children were thriving. Through her own family’s often funny experiences as well as interviews with other parents, teachers, and experts, Zaske shares the many unexpected parenting lessons she learned from living in Germany. Achtung Baby reveals that today's Germans know something that American parents don't (or have perhaps forgotten) about raising kids with “Selbstandigkeit” (self-reliance), and provides practical examples American parents can use to give their own children the freedom they need to grow into responsible, independent adults.

 Bringing Up BebeBringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting, by Pamela Druckerman, 2012. When American journalist Pamela Druckerman had a baby in Paris, she didn't aspire to become a "French parent." But she noticed that French children slept through the night by two or three months old. They ate braised leeks. They played by themselves while their parents sipped coffee. And yet French kids were still boisterous, curious, and creative. Why? How? With a notebook stashed in her diaper bag, Druckerman set out to investigate—and wound up sparking a national debate on parenting. Researched over three years and written in her warm, funny voice, Bringing Up Bébé is deeply wise, charmingly told, and destined to become a classic resource for American parents

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